DNC raises just $3.8 million in July. Is it a "crisis"?

DNC raises just $3.8 million in July. Is it a "crisis"?

Democrats should be worried?

The DNC reached its lowest fundraising total in a decade last month, raising just 3.8 million. But fundraising is hardly depressed on both sides: the RNC raised $10.2 million in the same period. A look at the GOP advantage in cash on hand is starker still, with $47.1 million in reserves compared to a paltry $6.9 million for Democrats. The sobering numbers - which, on the surface, may seem to challenge assumptions about a Democratic blow out in 2018 - have led some to declare it a "looming crisis."

A look at the numbers behind the "crisis":

There's no doubt the DNC is struggling:

Bernie Sanders's presidential candidacy mobilized many Democratic voters, but emails revealed that the DNC favored Clinton in the general election, leading to accusations that the committee "rigged" the election in favor of Clinton.
Sanders raised $218 million from $2.8 million donors - a kind of small-donor effort Democrats could learn from - but the DNC has struggled to engage his supporters.
“They keep thinking it’s the list. It’s so crazy. It’s like someone who buys a $12,000 bicycle and thinks they can win the Tour de France." - Becky Bond, a senior advisor to Sanders
Sanders has said he will remain an Independent, and noted that the DNC "will not succeed unless it attracts many, many millions of Independents."

When new DNC Chairman Tom Perez took over, there were just three fundraising strategists.

A top-down overhaul is the first step to rebuilding the brand, but, as Jonathan Swan of Axios notes, there is a feeling on the Hill that the energy is coming from groups outside the party.

A silver lining - The DNC is not synonymous with the Democratic Party, and the House and Senate committees have kept pace:

President Trump's approval rating is abysmal, and the GOP has yet to achieve a single major legislative victory. "We really should be kicking their asses. It shouldn't even be close, considering all hell is breaking loose on their side," said one Democratic donor.
But the Democratic party - if not breaking loose - is itself in the middle of a rebuild.
The DNC's woes have not extended to the House or the Senate, both of whom have kept pace or slightly edged the GOP in fundraising, per The Hill:
"On the House side, both the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee and the National Republican Congressional Committee each raised about $60 million in the first six months of 2017.

"Comparing Senate candidates is more difficult, since many more Democratic incumbents than Republicans find themselves in difficult reelection fights. But the Democratic Senatorial Campaign Committee outraised the National Republican Senatorial Campaign by a slim $700,000 margin
President Trump, who has made little effort to reach outside his base, remains a bright spot for Republicans: In just the first six-months of 2017, the RNC raised more than it has in an entire year since 2008.
"You've gotta give people something to be for," said Jamal Simmons, a Democratic strategist.

Democrats should be worried?